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Author Topic: Pope Francis condemns hypocrisy  (Read 4705 times)
Alan
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piggysiggy
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« on: June 19, 2013, 12:54:38 PM »

This is awesome!  This is the kind of thing we need to start taking power away from dualistic "head people"

Pope Francis condemns hypocrisy  http://en.radiovaticana.va/news/2013/06/19/pope_francis_condemns_hypocrisy/en1-702937

The article in full:

(Vatican Radio) Christianity is not simply the study of laws or commands: this is an impediment to understanding and living the truth that God is joy and generosity. This was the message of Pope Francis at Mass celebrated this morning in Casa Santa Marta.

The hypocrites who “lead the people of God down a dead-end street” Pope Francis said, are the subject of today’s Gospel. The Pope reflected on the famous passage of Matthew’s Gospel that contrasts the behaviour of the scribes and Pharisees – who make a show of praying, fasting, and almsgiving – with the path indicated by Jesus, Who points out to His disciples the proper attitude to assume in the same circumstances: giving alms and praying “in secret.” “And your Father, Who sees in secret, will reward you.”

Pope Francis criticized not only the vanity of the scribes and Pharisees, but also those who impose “so many precepts on the faithful.” He called them “hypocrites of casuistry,” “intellectuals without talent” who “don’t have the intelligence to find God, to explain God with understanding,” and so prevent themselves and others from entering into the Kingdom of God:

“Jesus says: ‘You do not enter yourselves, nor do you allow entrance to others.’ They are ethicists without goodness, they do not know what goodness is. But they are ethicists, aren’t they? ‘You have to do this, and this, and this . . .’ They fill you with precepts, but without goodness. And those are some of the phylacteries, of the tassels they lengthen, so many things, to make a pretence of being majestic, perfect, they have no sense of beauty. They have no sense of beauty. They achieve only the beauty of a museum. They are intellectuals without talent, ethicists without goodness, the bearers of museum beauty. These are the hypocrites that Jesus rebukes so strongly.

“But He doesn’t stop there,” Pope Francis continued. “In today’s Gospel, the Lord speaks about another class of hypocrites, ‘holy rollers’ [It: quelli che vanno sul sacro]:

“The Lord speaks about fasting, about prayer, about almsgiving: the three pillars of Christian piety, of interior conversion, that the Church proposes to us all in Lent. There are even hypocrites along this path, who make a show of fasting, of giving alms, of praying. I think that when hypocrisy reaches this point in the relation with God, we are coming very close to the sin against the Holy Spirit. These do not know beauty, they do not know love, these do not know the truth: they are small, cowardly.”

“We think about the hypocrisy in the Church: how bad it makes all of us,” Pope Francis said candidly. Instead he pointed out another “icon” for imitation, a person described in another passage of the Gospel: the publican who prayed with humble simplicity, “Have mercy on me, O Lord, a sinner.” This, the Pope said, “is the prayer we should say every day, knowing that we are sinners” but “with concrete sins, not theoretical [sin].” And this prayer, he concluded, “will help us to take the opposite road,” the road opposed to the hypocrisy that we are all tempted to:

“But all of us also have grace, the grace that comes from Jesus Christ: the grace of joy; the grace of magnanimity, of largesse. Hypocrites do not know what joy is, what largesse is, what magnanimity is.”

The Holy Father concelebrated Mass with Cardinal Marc Ouellet and Archbishop Lorenzo Baldisseri, the prefect and secretary of the Congregation for Bishops; and with Archbishop Vincenzo Paglia and Bishop Jean Lafitte, the president and secretary of the Pontifical Council of the Family. Members of the Congregation of Bishops and of the Pontifical Council of the Family were in attendance at the Mass.
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Alan
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2013, 12:57:26 PM »

This really sums up one of the main things WordsFree is for.  Offer healing to those who have been battered around by argumentative rule-mongers that confuse and scare people into going around and obsessing over following rules, and being paranoid about their relationship with God for fear of the tiniest details of matters that don't matter.

Alan
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2013, 02:38:03 PM »

This is the kind of talk that could bring about an assasination attempt from the inside! We know how the pillars of the church reacted to Jesus pointing out such things.
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This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2013, 03:36:35 PM »

This is AWESOME! Cool  It made me think of one particular poster on another catholic forum who regularly copies and pastes the same response (from a book of Catholic theology) over and over again and often doesn't add much else except, "Go ask your confessor."  I am in NO WAY saying this person is a hypocrite NOR am I saying he doesn't mean well.  I'm also not saying it's not helpful information for SOME people.  It even helped me to a certain extent on a particular issue.  But let's face it:  Many of the people (myself included) who post questions on catholic forums cannot apply the teachings of the Church to their specific situation.  If they could, they wouldn't need to post the question in the first place!  Similarly, I cannot go ask my confessor every single time I have a question.  If I did, he would soon be doing nothing else!  And while I'm on my soapbox, people who spout off about canon law (I'm NOT referring to the same poster as above--just to people in general) have NO BUSINESS doing so unless they have a degree in canon law!!!  I am so fortunate that my pastor is very intelligent and has worked in the marriage tribunals and knows a lot about how canon law is applied in those situations.  Because after reading canon law online, I thought my marriage was invalid!!  My pastor put that to rest in the first two minutes of our conversation!  And I know I should be reading the catechism, but frankly it upsets me.  Especially the BALTIMORE catechism!!!  Read that for awhile, and you'll soon feel you are doomed to Hell (if you have scruples anyway).  I think I'm better off for now reading and studying scripture, praying the rosary, and going to Adoration when I can.  (and of course partaking of the Sacraments).  
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Daizies
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2013, 06:08:13 PM »

I may have to print this article off so that I can read it when I'm feeling discouraged and on the scrupulous side. 

On a side note, I had never even heard of the Baltimore Catechism prior to joining CAF.  As far as the Catechism, I prefer the Youth Catechism (YouCat) because it's easier to understand.  It's not that I'm clueless (I'm told I'm quite bright ).  But the language is so technical that I just don't get it.
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JimR-OCDS
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2013, 06:05:42 PM »

If you were to post the words of Pope Francis in certain Catholic forums, and not reveal who wrote it, you'd be attacked and probably
banned.  Grin

Jim
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Alan
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2013, 06:18:38 PM »

If you were to post the words of Pope Francis in certain Catholic forums, and not reveal who wrote it, you'd be attacked and probably
banned.  Grin

Jim

 Grin
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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2013, 07:02:14 PM »

I may have to print this article off so that I can read it when I'm feeling discouraged and on the scrupulous side.  

On a side note, I had never even heard of the Baltimore Catechism prior to joining CAF.  As far as the Catechism, I prefer the Youth Catechism (YouCat) because it's easier to understand.  It's not that I'm clueless (I'm told I'm quite bright ).  But the language is so technical that I just don't get it.

OMG I never even heard of it until the year St. Julie home-school three of the children.  It was a program run by Elizabeth Ann Seton's home course.  They were very hands on; you actually sent them the tests for grading, etc.  They were also very conservative, and used the Baltimore Catechism for religion class.  I didn't have a lot to say at the time except I thought it was a lot of rote memorization and not much learning.

Now I'm thinking it would be fun to learn a few and throw them around from time to time when I'm surrounded by "harrumph" type people.  Watch they'll probably be experts at it.

Alan

Edit: here's a BC quiz.  I haven't taken it yet so I don't know if it's as funny as it thinks it is.
http://www.gotoquiz.com/do_you_know_your_baltimore_catechism
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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2013, 10:55:56 PM »

My husband (who is 58) went to Catholic School all the way through graduation, and said he was taught from the Baltimore Catechism.  He said they just recited back to the nuns like "little parrots".  I think he got very little out of it.  Our parish priest learned from the same catechism and obviously walked away with a lot more.  For me, as a scrupulous adult, I find it very scary.  Somehow I find scripture more comforting, even the parts where Jesus speaks of Hell.   Huh
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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2013, 12:26:03 AM »


OMG I never even heard of it until the year St. Julie home-school three of the children.  It was a program run by Elizabeth Ann Seton's home course.  They were very hands on; you actually sent them the tests for grading, etc.  They were also very conservative, and used the Baltimore Catechism for religion class.  I didn't have a lot to say at the time except I thought it was a lot of rote memorization and not much learning.

Now I'm thinking it would be fun to learn a few and throw them around from time to time when I'm surrounded by "harrumph" type people.  Watch they'll probably be experts at it.

Alan

Edit: here's a BC quiz.  I haven't taken it yet so I don't know if it's as funny as it thinks it is.
http://www.gotoquiz.com/do_you_know_your_baltimore_catechism
If anyone else does the quiz, put your age as under 18 or it takes off points for your age  Tongue  From the comments, it appears to be impossible to get 100%  (I got 96, but most of the answers are pretty self-evident)
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« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2013, 07:41:24 AM »

I went to Catholic School before Vatican II.

We where not taught the Baltimore Catechism, we were forced to memorize it.

I remember vividly when I was in the fourth grade. It was only the second day of the new school year, and our Catechism were brand new, with shinny
covers.

The very first thing I remember the nun saying was "catechism." So, I broke out my new catechism, all excited that we were going to learn something new. I loved school up to that point.

The next thing that happened was, the nun slapped me across the face while stating, "THIS IS A TEST." Sure enough, she was testing how much we memorized from 3rd grade. I was so shaken, having never been hit by my previous nuns, especially St Norine my 3rd grade teacher who I believe must be a saint, I completely failed the test. This of course resulted in punishment home work for the entire class, for most of us didn't know the questions that were on the test, they were further into the catechism than what we memorized in third grade.

From that day on, I hated school, until I went to public school in the 7th grade. I also began to hate religion, especially the Catholic Church, but that's another longs story.

Jim
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« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2013, 10:53:57 AM »

Your story doesn't sound a lot different from mine Jim. I did leave the church for a long time, only really coming back in an active way in the late 90's, largely because of that early "education."

Yes, to this day I can still recite a good part of the BC answers. I'm not going to bother with the quiz though I only found one question in the first 15 that wasn't immediately obvious to me.
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This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
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« Reply #12 on: June 24, 2013, 03:08:12 PM »

I actually got curious and took the test.  I received a 99%.  I did cheat a little which would null and void the test.  At first I got a 97% and they don't show you what you missed.  I went back and reread the test and found my mistake and changed my answer.  They did a proper job of brainwashing me.   I don't think it's really cheating it's plain old curiosity.  The answers still have much meaning to me, I went right back to rote mode.
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Linda Clare
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« Reply #13 on: June 24, 2013, 03:13:03 PM »

Hmmmm. I wonder where my post went.  Don't tell me it's in the wrong spot AGAIN!
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Linda Clare
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« Reply #14 on: June 24, 2013, 03:14:31 PM »

Oh phew,  there it is.
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Linda Clare
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« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2013, 03:14:58 PM »

I actually got curious and took the test.  I received a 99%.  I did cheat a little which would null and void the test.  At first I got a 97% and they don't show you what you missed.  I went back and reread the test and found my mistake and changed my answer.  They did a proper job of brainwashing me.   I don't think it's really cheating it's plain old curiosity.  The answers still have much meaning to me, I went right back to rote mode.

That's awesome!  I still haven't taken the test.

But you "cheated" and upped from 97% to 99%.  I would rather not call that cheating, but Making Improvements.  Engineering Upgrade.  Wink

Sure it's curiosity.  But you say "cheating" as if it were a Bad Thing.   Grin  

Hee hee hee.  I'll probably rot in hell for posting that!  Roll Eyes

Alan
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« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2013, 03:26:50 PM »

Quote: Linda Clare
The answers still have much meaning to me, I went right back to rote mode.

You know, that's a funny thing. Even after all my years out of the church that stuff came right back to me. And while I laugh at how ridiculous it was to be memorizing such stuff, it does serve a purpose, much like learning the times tables does to building a foundation in math.

I see that whole idea as being double-edged. Yes, it gave me a foundation base of "knowledge" but did so without providing context or meaning. It gave me the "facts" but without encouraging any ownership of them, or giving even an inclination that they were only the starting point. As a foundation that expresses what we believe that can later be unpackaged to find out why we believe it, and internalize whether we believe it, it has the potential to have value.

Unfortunately the church does an abysmal job at leading people into any sense of journey or relationship with God and ends up leaving us with the idea that once we're confirmed we've learned everything there is to know and all that is required after that is showing up on Sundays. They provide us with all the "answers" but do us a great disservice in then implying that there aren't any questions for us to ask, and thus nothing to cause us to actually engage our own faith rather than just spouting somebody else's. The kind of stuff you see at CAF is what you get from that, a bunch of people spewing official opinions, or something they read on some blog or website, without having ever actually examined it themselves or having ever actually experienced God.

To bring it back to the thread topic, that is the ultimate hypocrisy. To think we can beat into somebody else something we don't even understand and which ultimately has nothing to do with our relationship to God. Until we get back to that single new commandment, Love one another as I have loved you, all the rest of it is meaningless drivel.
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"Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called children of God."
This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
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« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2013, 03:49:46 PM »

I agree John.  I guess it's time for me to move on and start something with my spiritual life again.
Thanks
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« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2013, 03:52:37 PM »

I see Pope Francis is basically being Jesus to the Church here:

Matt 23: (NIV)

23 Then Jesus said to the crowds and to his disciples: 2 “The teachers of the law and the Pharisees sit in Moses’ seat. 3 So you must be careful to do everything they tell you. But do not do what they do, for they do not practice what they preach. 4 They tie up heavy, cumbersome loads and put them on other people’s shoulders, but they themselves are not willing to lift a finger to move them.

5 “Everything they do is done for people to see: They make their phylacteries[a] wide and the tassels on their garments long; 6 they love the place of honor at banquets and the most important seats in the synagogues; 7 they love to be greeted with respect in the marketplaces and to be called ‘Rabbi’ by others.

8 “But you are not to be called ‘Rabbi,’ for you have one Teacher, and you are all brothers. 9 And do not call anyone on earth ‘father,’ for you have one Father, and he is in heaven. 10 Nor are you to be called instructors, for you have one Instructor, the Messiah. 11 The greatest among you will be your servant. 12 For those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.

Seven Woes on the Teachers of the Law and the Pharisees

13 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You shut the door of the kingdom of heaven in people’s faces. You yourselves do not enter, nor will you let those enter who are trying to. [14]

15 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You travel over land and sea to win a single convert, and when you have succeeded, you make them twice as much a child of hell as you are.

16 “Woe to you, blind guides! You say, ‘If anyone swears by the temple, it means nothing; but anyone who swears by the gold of the temple is bound by that oath.’ 17 You blind fools! Which is greater: the gold, or the temple that makes the gold sacred? 18 You also say, ‘If anyone swears by the altar, it means nothing; but anyone who swears by the gift on the altar is bound by that oath.’ 19 You blind men! Which is greater: the gift, or the altar that makes the gift sacred? 20 Therefore, anyone who swears by the altar swears by it and by everything on it. 21 And anyone who swears by the temple swears by it and by the one who dwells in it. 22 And anyone who swears by heaven swears by God’s throne and by the one who sits on it.

23 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You give a tenth of your spices—mint, dill and cumin. But you have neglected the more important matters of the law—justice, mercy and faithfulness. You should have practiced the latter, without neglecting the former. 24 You blind guides! You strain out a gnat but swallow a camel.

25 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You clean the outside of the cup and dish, but inside they are full of greed and self-indulgence. 26 Blind Pharisee! First clean the inside of the cup and dish, and then the outside also will be clean.

27 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You are like whitewashed tombs, which look beautiful on the outside but on the inside are full of the bones of the dead and everything unclean. 28 In the same way, on the outside you appear to people as righteous but on the inside you are full of hypocrisy and wickedness.

29 “Woe to you, teachers of the law and Pharisees, you hypocrites! You build tombs for the prophets and decorate the graves of the righteous. 30 And you say, ‘If we had lived in the days of our ancestors, we would not have taken part with them in shedding the blood of the prophets.’ 31 So you testify against yourselves that you are the descendants of those who murdered the prophets. 32 Go ahead, then, and complete what your ancestors started!

33 “You snakes! You brood of vipers! How will you escape being condemned to hell? 34 Therefore I am sending you prophets and sages and teachers. Some of them you will kill and crucify; others you will flog in your synagogues and pursue from town to town. 35 And so upon you will come all the righteous blood that has been shed on earth, from the blood of righteous Abel to the blood of Zechariah son of Berekiah, whom you murdered between the temple and the altar. 36 Truly I tell you, all this will come on this generation.

37 “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing. 38 Look, your house is left to you desolate. 39 For I tell you, you will not see me again until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.’[c]”


Note: I used NIV because I like the site I get it from:  http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=matt%2023&version=NIV and when I copy the Catholic one from the US Bishops it takes a lot of reformatting.

The Catholic version at US Bishops site: http://usccb.org/bible/matthew/23

Alan
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« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2013, 04:55:31 PM »

To add to what John Posted, although memorizing the Catechism had it's merit, I think what I most got from Catholic School, which people I know today who have returned to the Church, don't have because they diddn't go to Catholic school, is the stories of the saints.

One thing the nuns did well is teach us about the saints. Perhaps it's because the Saints inspired them to go into their vocations.

My friend who is such a revert without Catholic education, never heard of the First Five Fridays and devotion to the Sacred Heart.
He jumped on that devotion immediately.

Then, when I told him about St Francis, he started reading about him and his way of life.

Also, on the math and other stuff, when I went to public school in junior high, the other kids wanted to copy off my papers, because I was so far ahead of them.


Jim
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« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2013, 10:09:56 AM »

I agree John.  I guess it's time for me to move on and start something with my spiritual life again.
Thanks

Linda, if you do nothing more than sit in silence, or maybe take some small passage of scripture and really reflect on it and what it might mean in your life, you'd be miles ahead of memorizing any catechism.

I wouldn't get too hung up on the church's rules and regulations or their internal politics and divisions. I believe it was Augustine that said "God has many the church doesn't have; and the church has many that God doesn't have."
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This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
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« Reply #21 on: June 25, 2013, 10:12:41 AM »

To add to what John Posted, although memorizing the Catechism had it's merit, I think what I most got from Catholic School, which people I know today who have returned to the Church, don't have because they diddn't go to Catholic school, is the stories of the saints.



Good point Jim! As long as you got more than the "prettied up" versions of the saints. I found those depressing since they reinforced my feelings of unworthiness and that I could never make it. I much more appreciated someone like Augustine who got it all wrong for so long and didn't at all mind letting you know how he struggled.
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"Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called children of God."
This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
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« Reply #22 on: June 25, 2013, 11:15:49 AM »

Linda, if you do nothing more than sit in silence, or maybe take some small passage of scripture and really reflect on it and what it might mean in your life, you'd be miles ahead of memorizing any catechism.

I wouldn't get too hung up on the church's rules and regulations or their internal politics and divisions. I believe it was Augustine that said "God has many the church doesn't have; and the church has many that God doesn't have."

I agree with John!  With one small caution:  I would make sure you have a Catholic bible--one with notes at the bottom to help interpret scripture meaning.  I mean, YES, we should reflect on scripture and how we can apply it to our lives, but at the same time we want to be careful not to leave all the interpretation up to ourselves--leaving us open for error.  I don't think that's what John meant, though.   Of course it's important to know what the Church teaches, but for me personally I'd rather watch EWTN and learn from their programs--they usually give me comfort and hope--not send me into the depths of despair.  Others love the catechism and it causes them no problems.
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« Reply #23 on: June 25, 2013, 11:42:45 AM »

Linda, if you do nothing more than sit in silence, or maybe take some small passage of scripture and really reflect on it and what it might mean in your life, you'd be miles ahead of memorizing any catechism.

I wouldn't get too hung up on the church's rules and regulations or their internal politics and divisions. I believe it was Augustine that said "God has many the church doesn't have; and the church has many that God doesn't have."

I agree with John!  With one small caution:  I would make sure you have a Catholic bible--one with notes at the bottom to help interpret scripture meaning.  I mean, YES, we should reflect on scripture and how we can apply it to our lives, but at the same time we want to be careful not to leave all the interpretation up to ourselves--leaving us open for error.  I don't think that's what John meant, though.   Of course it's important to know what the Church teaches, but for me personally I'd rather watch EWTN and learn from their programs--they usually give me comfort and hope--not send me into the depths of despair.  Others love the catechism and it causes them no problems.

What you are saying is a good idea, when one is looking for the literal meanings of the scriptures.  On many scriptures the Church has not stated a "literal" meaning.

There are deeper meanings of the Scripture that are entirely personal.  And not even "meanings" as much as "reactions."  I've heard it broken down several ways, but mainly there is literal interpretation, and allegorical interpretation, and then there is the way the scripture strikes us, personally, at the time in our lives that we encounter it.

This is a bit like Lectio Divina, which is an ancient monastic practice specifically mentioned in the CCC and even accepted by even the most orthodox Catholics.  At the deeper levels, you just hear the scripture, then let it go, and take notice of any thoughts it brings to you.  It's a bit like "word association."  I tried to make an online version of it called "Lectio WordsFree" but we haven't used it much.  You might get a ki  ck out of some of the things we thought about the few verses we did discuss in Lectio WordsFree, though, at:http://forums.wordsfree.org/index.php/board,50.0.html

Alan
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... love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law.
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« Reply #24 on: June 25, 2013, 01:46:24 PM »

Linda, if you do nothing more than sit in silence, or maybe take some small passage of scripture and really reflect on it and what it might mean in your life, you'd be miles ahead of memorizing any catechism.

I wouldn't get too hung up on the church's rules and regulations or their internal politics and divisions. I believe it was Augustine that said "God has many the church doesn't have; and the church has many that God doesn't have."

I agree with John!  With one small caution:  I would make sure you have a Catholic bible--one with notes at the bottom to help interpret scripture meaning.  I mean, YES, we should reflect on scripture and how we can apply it to our lives, but at the same time we want to be careful not to leave all the interpretation up to ourselves--leaving us open for error.  I don't think that's what John meant, though.   Of course it's important to know what the Church teaches, but for me personally I'd rather watch EWTN and learn from their programs--they usually give me comfort and hope--not send me into the depths of despair.  Others love the catechism and it causes them no problems.

What you are saying is a good idea, when one is looking for the literal meanings of the scriptures.  On many scriptures the Church has not stated a "literal" meaning.

There are deeper meanings of the Scripture that are entirely personal.  And not even "meanings" as much as "reactions."  I've heard it broken down several ways, but mainly there is literal interpretation, and allegorical interpretation, and then there is the way the scripture strikes us, personally, at the time in our lives that we encounter it.

This is a bit like Lectio Divina, which is an ancient monastic practice specifically mentioned in the CCC and even accepted by even the most orthodox Catholics.  At the deeper levels, you just hear the scripture, then let it go, and take notice of any thoughts it brings to you.  It's a bit like "word association."  I tried to make an online version of it called "Lectio WordsFree" but we haven't used it much.  You might get a ki  ck out of some of the things we thought about the few verses we did discuss in Lectio WordsFree, though, at:http://forums.wordsfree.org/index.php/board,50.0.html

Alan

This is true, especially in Lectio Devina. We are praying with Scripture and opening ourselves up to God, so that he can communicate to us in a deeper level.

It's not a time for Bible study or intellectual discourse, but a surrender in simple faith.


Jim
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