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Author Topic: Rohr Meditations -- Week of 7/15/2012 -- Richard Rohr's Lineage -- Orthopraxy in  (Read 2479 times)
Alan
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« on: July 15, 2012, 06:18:43 AM »


Richard's Daily Meditations

RICHARD ROHR'S LINEAGE


Orthopraxy in much of Buddhism and Hinduism

Orthopraxy is usually distinguished from orthodoxy. Orthodoxy refers to
doctrinal correctness, whereas orthopraxy refers to right practice. What
we see in many of the Eastern religions is not an emphasis upon verbal
orthodoxy, but instead upon practices and lifestyles that, if you do
them (not think about them, but do them), end up changing your
consciousness.

This was summed up in the Eighth Core Principle of the Center for Action
and Contemplation: We don’t think ourselves into a new way of living;
we live ourselves into a new way of thinking. I hope that can be a
central building block of the Living School [1].
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... love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law.
ncjohn
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« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2012, 07:37:36 AM »


 What we see in many of the Eastern religions is not an emphasis upon verbal
orthodoxy, but instead upon practices and lifestyles that, if you do
them (not think about them, but do them), end up changing your
consciousness.

This was summed up in the Eighth Core Principle of the Center for Action
and Contemplation: We don’t think ourselves into a new way of living;
we live ourselves into a new way of thinking.


Overall, I would say that is probably true, and at far more than just the spiritual level. We create new habits by repetition over a period of time. We don't do so by just thinking about changing what we're doing.

I think that is part of the original concept of Lent. Abstaining from a vice or practicing some virtue on a regular basis over a period of time that would then theoretically allow you to adopt this new and better way as a lifestyle change. I don't think it ends up working for most of us though, partly because we get to take Sundays off as a "treat day" which breaks the momentum. We also don't think of it as a lifestyle change going in but simply as a temporary sacrifice that we can cheat at a little if it gets too hard.
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"Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called children of God."
This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
Alan
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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2012, 08:22:34 AM »

July 16, 2012



Richard's Daily Meditations

RICHARD ROHR'S LINEAGE


Much of the teaching of C. G. Jung

Some people do not like the fact that I quote the Swiss psychologist C.
G. Jung. I must admit that he’s had a major influence on my entire
life. I first read him when I was very young, and again and again he
would offer phrases that I knew were true. When I first read his work, I
didn’t have the education to academically know that. I just knew
intuitively that “He is right.” Carl Gustav Jung was a great
thinker, and he wanted to bring externalized religion back to its
internal foundations. He brought together amazing theology (his father
was a Protestant minister) with very good psychology—and he is surely
not an "enemy" of religion at all. When asked if he "believed' in God,
he said, with wonderful simplicity, "I do not believe, I know."

I’m not saying I agree with every word he’s ever said, but what I am
saying is that “much of the teaching of C. G. Jung” is in my
lineage. He gives us more than enough wisdom to trust him. After all, I
am sure you do not agree with every word I say. I would be disappointed
in you if you did.
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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2012, 01:35:06 PM »

July 16, 2012

...

I’m not saying I agree with every word he’s ever said, but what I am
saying is that “much of the teaching of C. G. Jung” is in my
lineage. He gives us more than enough wisdom to trust him. After all, I
am sure you do not agree with every word I say. I would be disappointed
in you if you did.

I do like this line of reasoning.  I think too many people are very careful to check the credentials of someone, and judge what they say based on predetermined decisions about that author.  So we tend to say, "this is from a guy I trust," or "this can't be right because I don't trust this guy," in a dualistic right/wrong categorization.  This way it's simple.  Does the book have imprimatur?  yes or no.  Under whose authority does this person speak?  qualified or not?  It's all accept or reject everything based on the person, not the thing said.

Personally, I find it easier to relax when listening to someone I trust and even though now and then by BS meter may twitch, it is overall relaxing.  There are a couple whose lectures I can listen to for hours, typically without a single twitch.  Other people, I try to follow them but their logic is screwy so when they try to explain and get it wrong, my engineering mind wants to go off at every wrong statement and investigate, so I end up multitasking which makes it a bit harder to focus.

But either way, I very, very seldom accept someone else's statement as my own.  Until some time when I decide I totally believe it objectively and sincerely, I remember it came from outside and has not been "approved" for use as my own.  Like I'll say, "so and so said crime was going down," rather than, "crime is going down."  I may believe it is probably true, but until I am 100%-ish convinced, I won't say it as if I knew it personally as a fact.

Alan
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« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2012, 04:50:09 AM »

July 17, 2012



Richard's Daily Meditations

RICHARD ROHR'S LINEAGE


Nonviolent Recovery of Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr.

I’m told that the word “nonviolence” did not exist (at least in
the English and German languages) until the 1950s. There’s a reason
for that: the notion didn’t exist in our consciousness. We didn’t
create a word for it because we didn’t get it yet! When Gandhi came
along, he pointed out that every religion in the world knows that Jesus
of Nazareth taught and lived nonviolence except one
religion—Christianity. In very short order, after Gandhi, this became
obvious to many wise people throughout the world.

Martin Luther King, Jr. was the one who most influenced our American
culture regarding nonviolence. That’s why I speak of it as a recovery
of nonviolence. We had it, but we couldn’t hear it, especially after
Christianity became the imperial religion. When you’re imperial, you
can’t hear any talk of nonviolence. You have to be violent to be an
empire. So after 313 AD, we pretty much lost the nonviolent teaching of
Jesus and it was not recovered until the twentieth century. It’s sort
of unbelievable, but in between, nonviolence was almost universally
forgotten, denied, or ignored as Christianity needed to justify its own
violence.
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« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2012, 04:50:36 AM »

July 18, 2012



Richard's Daily Meditations

RICHARD ROHR'S LINEAGE


Unique witness of mythology, poetry, and art

My earliest recordings often included mythological stories, poetry, or
art to make the point. Many people are more right-brained learners than
left-brained. When you bring in a story, or a poem, or refer to a piece
of art, you can see people’s interest triple: “Wow, I’m with
you!” Whereas, if you stay on the verbal level all the time, their
eyes glaze over, they lose interest, they lose fascination and
identification with the message.

I don’t think Western preachers and teachers have really understood
the importance of art in general. Until people can "catch" the message
with an inner image, it usually does not go deep. We’ve also been
afraid of myths that weren’t Christian. In fact, we were afraid of the
very word “myth.” We thought it meant something that wasn’t true
when, in fact, it’s something that’s always true—if it’s a true
myth. This will be a very important substratum of the Living School [1]
curriculum.
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... love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law.
ncjohn
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« Reply #6 on: July 18, 2012, 06:15:49 AM »

We had it, but we couldn’t hear it, especially after
Christianity became the imperial religion. When you’re imperial, you
can’t hear any talk of nonviolence. You have to be violent to be an
empire.


Boy, ain't that the truth! The Church has ruled as an empire for a very long time and unfortunately there are still a lot of its members who very much like the "iron fist in the velvet glove" though truthfully there are far too many instances where even the velvet glove isn't there.
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"Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called children of God."
This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
Alan
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« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2012, 08:12:43 AM »

July 19, 2012



Scientific evidence from the Universe

We’re living in a really amazing time. When I was growing up, the
common perception was that science and religion were at odds. In the
last twenty or twenty-five years, that has radically changed. Now, as we
come to understand the nature of the cosmos (things like relationships,
space, darkness, and energy), we’re finding that many of the
intuitions of religion are being confirmed by science itself.

It makes sense: if truth is one (which it has to be, to be truth), then
all of us are just approaching that truth from a different angle.
Science is reading it at one level, and religion is reading it at
another. But we’re both looking at the same Reality. So I would like
our Living School [1] to really give science its due, and to give science
the credit it deserves for naming things in ways that will allow many
people to know and love God—and everything. Scientists today are often
validating, in different language, what the mystics and saints always
believed was true.
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« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2012, 07:15:20 AM »

July 20, 2012


Twelve Step Spirituality/American Pragmatism

Although I have never formally belonged to a Twelve Step program, I have
learned very much from people who are in recovery, and I finally wrote a
book on it called Breathing Underwater: Spirituality and the Twelve
Steps [1]. I think the Twelve Step program represents the best of a unique
American spirituality. There’s something in the American psyche that
gets mistrustful and impatient with anything that’s too abstract,
platonic, theoretical, or distant. For the American, it has to work. We
call that pragmatism.

[1]: http://store.cacradicalgrace.org/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=CFAAC&Product_Code=ST-BUNDLE-01&Category_Code=BK&Product_Count=1

I know that people around the world make fun of Americans because we are
so pragmatic. But I think it’s also what people admire about
Americans. In international meetings, I often sit there just bored to
death by the level of abstraction or beating around the bush. My fellow
Americans and I just want to pull it down to earth and get to the point,
thinking, “What works? Is this relevant? Does this theory mean
anything? Does it change people? Does it change anything?"

What the Twelve Step program does for many people is make the Gospel
believable, relevant, practical, and workable. So I will be referring to
it in our courses at the Living School [2], as I already have over the
years.
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ncjohn
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« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2012, 12:25:24 PM »

I'll be glad when he gets done with the infomercials and gets back to something actually reflect on.  Undecided
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"Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called children of God."
This is the effect of true charity, to be on good terms with all men, to consider no one your enemy, and to live at peace with those who hate peace.--Robert Bellarmine
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« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2012, 01:19:03 PM »

I'll be glad when he gets done with the infomercials and gets back to something actually reflect on.  Undecided

Yeah, for real.  Today's is at least slightly interesting.



Spiral Dynamics and Integral Theory

Spiral Dynamics [1], what Ken Wilber also calls Integral Theory [2], is probably
a completely new term to many of our people. In the last 150 years,
there have been many attempts to chart growth, to "schedule" levels of
maturity, morality, and consciousness. For me, these different theories
have been best summed up in the latest version, which some have called
Spiral Dynamics. It has nine levels of consciousness. The first three
coincide with the Purgative Way [3], the second three with the Illuminative
Way [4], and the third three with the Unitive Way [5] in Christianity.

[1]: http://www.kenwilber.com/home/landing/index.html
[2]: http://www.kenwilber.com/home/landing/index.html
[3]: http://carmelnet.org/larkin/larkin092.pdf
[4]: http://carmelnet.org/larkin/larkin092.pdf
[5]: http://carmelnet.org/larkin/larkin092.pdf

I am told that diplomats and ambassadors all over the world now rely
upon Spiral Dynamics to help them understand different cultures. They
recognize that many cultures are still largely at level three, and some
at one or two (out of nine). That doesn’t make them bad people, but it
helps us understand how they’re likely to respond to violence, to
fear, to authority, and to relationships. So I would like to popularize
the notion of Integral Theory, because I think it’s a way for us
ordinary folks to understand things in a rather sophisticated way.
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